A studio visit with Nicolas Poillot (Etudes Studio pt. 2)

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photographs by Maciek Pozoga

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
Our studio is in Paris, in the 11th district close to Le Haut-Marais, to be more precise.
It is a very quiet area and also very central, it is within a large courtyard in a passage where there were old goldsmith workshops. Now most of the space is rehabilitated in studios or offices.
We’ve been working here for over a year now, and it feels nice.

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What are the pros and cons of your studio?
It’s really good to have a physical space to work. Our studio is in a very quiet and cool area with a beautiful natural light, which is rare in Paris, and it is also very close to my home. About the cons, a slight lack of space from time to time, but everyone always wants more space.

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How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
About 10 hours per day, it depends on the projects we are working on.
We may be shooting for a client, or meeting with an artist, but the studio remains our headquarters and the main starting point for all our projects. So my weeks are always busy in a way.

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Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For example, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
Somehow yes, but we are fortunate to be independent and can manage our days as we want.
I mostly work and follow all the projects related to the publishing house and the Studio part (art direction, consulting, photography, photo editing, meetings etc).
The only aspect of the routine as he described it previously, is to wait until my partner Aurélien - who lives in New York - starts his day to have a Skype conference with him, and talk about life and work.

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Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Not really, though I might not have a beer until I’ve accomplished a couple of things I had to do that day.

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Do you sometimes wish you had your own studio? What are the pros and cons of sharing your workspace with someone else?
In my case, I use to work with my partners on the same projects, so I think it is an advantage to share it with them.
We work as a group so we need to meet regularly to discuss the work in progress and exchange about it. So, I think of our workspace as a central nucleus to our creative process and to our research.

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What is your favorite track to edit photos to?
Here are a few pieces amongst many others..

for more of Nicolas’ work, please visit www.etudes-studio.com

A studio visit with Aurélien Arbet (Etudes Studio pt.1)

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photographs by Osma Harvilahti

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
We have been in Greenpoint, Brooklyn for 3 years.
It is our creative studio/office, we develop and follow all projects from the studio for this side of the globe and we also do some art direction and consulting for clients in the US and Canada. We also have a showroom in Manhattan for press at Mode PR’s office .

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A studio visit with Thomas Mailaender

photographs by David Luraschi

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
I have two places in which I work. One is my office in the 18th area in Paris. Actually it’s more a man’s cave, where I spent a lot of time on the internet searching for things to collect, mostly erotic stuff and militaria.
The other one where I’ve invited you today is located in Asnieres just outside of Paris. It’s a 4000 square meter ex printer factory that I share with 16 others artists.
The place is named SIRA like the printer that left the building, and it’s run by Anatole Maggiar of Mad Agency who created the place as a phalanstery for Art.

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
I consider this place a playground. It’s huge with an outside and a rooftop. Absolutely everything is possible here since the building is located in a industrial area. Last year for a project, I shot with a automatic riffle in the basement and no one came to disturb me while I was working. That’s a real benefit. I recently built a 12 x 2 meters pond in the dark to produce the biggest cyanotype of the world. Square meters matters! Another good advantage of this place is that we can share and exchange skills with other artists. My studio mate Antoine Daniel is a wood specialist. We help each other with what we know how to do best. If I had to find a bad side of this place I’d say that in winter, it’s cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
It really depends on the shows and production of new pieces and shooting for commercial works. I share my time between this place and my office. Right now I do a lot of ceramic so I am quite often here playing with mud. Next month I’ll be away in Belgium for an exhibition.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For example, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
Whenever I’ll arrive at my studio, I’ll spend about one hour reading some books to get inspiration. I am not very much into high literature, I mostly go for “do it yourself books” like the great “how to become a professional stuntman in one week” that I just finished. I am also a big reader of stuff like the Guiness books, erotic magazines, hunting or fishing manuals. After this kind of brain food I usually feel like I could be the king of the world and that’s the good moment for me to really start working. The rest of the day never becomes a routine, I try not to repeat things in my professional life. I use that space to shoot personal projects, do sculpture or installation as well as producing some commercial photography as well, like advertisement or industrial product. Every day is a different day.

Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
My studio is a men-only territory. Of course sometime we are open to welcome some women like for example when we need some female models for a shooting or when a female curator wants to see some new works.
But I try to limit as much as possible the feminine presence in order not to lose focus on my work.
Alcohol is also a trap which I try hard no to fall in. Although it happens that on special occasions I get drunk with my assistant or friends stopping by, I am sober most of the time in my studio.

Do you sometimes wish you had your own studio? What are the pros and cons of sharing your workspace with other people?
The space we’ve got here is big enough for me to sometimes get lost in it. Some days, I hardly see a human being since I am totally into my work.
So I can’t say that sharing a workspace here can be bothering. Artist life can sometimes be a bit lonely and since I don’t have a pet, it’s good to know that you have studio mates to hug.

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?

for more of Thomas’ work, please visit www.thomasmailaender.com

oranbeg:


Interleaves Spotlight: 
Pauline Magnenat

Buy an interleaf in our Shop!

Interleaves Page

and

SUBMIT work to Oranbeg NET 04: i fear for my safety  

Curators: Nathaniel Grann & Jordan Swartz of Empty Stretch 

Submissions due March 15th, 2014 at midnight. 

cool dudes

Reblogged from oranbeg with 51 notes

mossfull:

Pauline Magnenat, Going West

mossfull:

Pauline Magnenat, Going West

Reblogged from mossfull with 30 notes

Happy to show you my latest body of work, "Going West". More here.

I hope you’ll like it.

A studio visit with David Brandon Geeting and Grant Willing

This interview, along with Jason Nocito’s studio visit and Mark Steinmetz’s, are published in the latest issue of British magazine Of The Afternoon. You can get a copy here.

photos by Osma Harvilahti

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
Grant: It’s above a gym in Brooklyn, near Myrtle/Broadway. Dave and I have had the lease for only a few months now, but I’ve had friends in the same building for a few of years so I feel like I’ve been hanging out there for quite a while now.
David: It’s in this industrial looking building above this weird secret gym called Richie’s Gym. We’ve took over the lease on July 1st, our friend Bryan Krueger used to have the space for a while and then we copped it from him.

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
Grant: I really like the location of the studio - I live about 15 minutes away, so it’s close enough and I really like having friends in the same building, too. The studio itself has huge windows and gets really pretty light; it’s just a good working vibe there. It’s nice having a place that is near where I live, but not too close, so it encourages me to be working on stuff more frequently. Also, since I’ve been hanging around there for a while I already feel comfortable and familiar with being there. When I’m there I get in a good working mood and feel more productive than when I used to have a studio space in the back of my old apartment.
Not too much of a con for now, but I could always wish for more space. It doesn’t feel too small, but bigger would always be better. I also wish there were some better coffee options nearby.
David: The pros are that it’s not my apartment, so I don’t really care about making a mess. I was afraid to make anything totally nuts in my apartment because I didn’t want to see a big mess in my apartment, plus my cats were running around sniffing stuff and knocking stuff over all the time. Also, being in the studio just forces me to make something, even if it’s not working out, I am going through the motions of creating, because that’s what I came there to do. At home it’s too easy to like, walk over to the fridge and space out for fifteen minutes. The cons are that it’s a little small for portraiture, and I’ve been into taking portraits lately. But the restriction has caused me to do what I can with what I have, and I am getting really into super tight crops. As someone who has spent the first two decades of their life being the biggest debbie downer, I have been trying to think positive lately.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
Grant: It fluctuates quite a bit: sometimes I’ll be there three or four days per week, others I’ll only stop by for one day. I usually end up there a night or two during the week for a few hours, and try to spend a good portion of one of the weekend days there. On average I’d say something like 15 hours, with a lot of weeks being more or less.
David: I try to go at least three days a week, and I’m there from like 11am - 5pm or so. So I’d say like 18 hours on a good week. I am also really bad at going there some weeks, in which case I do most of the work from home - especially if I have a lot of computer stuff to do. But there is never a week where I am not doing work. There’s ALWAYS something to do.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For exemple, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
Grant: I don’t have a permanent computer there, and I usually only bring my computer there for music, if I think I’m going to be there for a long day, or if I’m photographing something and need to start looking at the images right away. I’ve been using the studio space mostly as a more meditative and practice-based area where I’m trying out new mediums and just focusing on making work, rather than using it as a place for me to answer emails and work on retouching photos. I’ve never had a dedicated space to do that before – I’ve always enjoyed working from my laptop at home when I’m just sitting on my couch – so I’m treating the studio more as a place that is purely about creating things. This might eventually change, but it’s what I initially wanted out of a studio.
I don’t really have a set routine when I’m working there either. I tend to plan out my work beforehand pretty extensively, to one extent, so I have an idea of what I’ll be doing for each day I’m there. Even though the plans are made, it can take me a while to get into art-making mode, so I’ll end up drinking a beer or coffee and watching people walk on the street for a while. Since I’m focusing on working on things like painting and drawing, I’m a bit out of my element and am trying to approach these mediums as naturally as possible. It feels like a tall order after being so set in photography for a while. I’m trying to take the parts that I like from my photographic practice and just expand into other mediums or at least integrate more ideas that aren’t so photo-specific. There have been some pretty funny results so far when you take away the tools you normally rely on and put something else in their place. It’s been a fairly cathartic few months though, which is nice.
David: I normally walk up the stairs with a bunch of stuff I brought from home (props/paper/equipment/etc), open the studio door and drop it on the table. Then I start up my computer and throw some music on, usually bad hip-hop. Then I go pee, come back, set up lights, start messing around on my tabletop/seamless shooting area, and I’ll stop to take a few photos every time the moment feels right. On days when I come in specifically to shoot a set of photos for a client, there is no downtime, I jump into it right away, banging out each concept on the checklist. I am a super anxious person, so I like to get stuff done right away. I literally shoot that stuff soon as I can, sometimes right after I get the job. When I am finished taking photos, whether they are personal or commissioned, I hop on my laptop and start editing them, taking breaks in between to answer and send emails. Lunch is insanely important to me - I break for lunch no matter what I have on my plate that day. I am super big on getting three meals a day, I get light headed and angry and weird when I don’t eat.

Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Grant: Not really, or at least I wouldn’t go so far as to say I forbid anything. I deliberately don’t bring my computer a lot of the time, but that is more because I don’t want to carry it from my apartment to the studio. I’m not too concerned with productivity yet since the space is more about just working for right now. I still handle my productive side of my work from home since all of that is computer-based, like emailing and editing photos.
David: Not really. Sometimes I will set rules like “no Facebook until you are done editing this photo,” but other than that, my production is kind of fueled by going with the flow. It always has been. I like letting outside sources influence what I am producing, so if I limit those possibilities, my work ends up being pretty boring.

Do you sometimes wish you had your own studio? What are the pros and cons of sharing your workspace with someone else?
Grant: I haven’t really thought about that too much since it’s actually fairly rare that Dave and I are working there at the same time. We have different work schedules, so our time in the studio doesn’t overlap a ton just yet. We actually see each other a lot more often out of the studio than in it. But at the same time, I think I’d be lying if I said I didn’t ever wish I had my own place. I think everyone does in some way. It would be great to have my own huge studio where I could work on really large-scale pieces and just blast metal all day long without concern for anyone else. That’s not very practical for right now, though, and in any realistic case I love sharing a studio.
Dave and I get along really well on both a good friend and a good studio-mate level. We both have a healthy respect for one another and can talk about each other’s work even though our work is fairly different in appearance. I like reaping the energy he’s left behind and using it to motivate me to be working on as many good things, too. It’s a funny translation since what Dave has been focusing on is so different than what I’ve been working on, but at the same time I can get a similar air of how we’re working on things in a pretty congruent manner. Just having a separate space away from our apartments and seeing how the other works is a good experience on a number of levels.
If there were any cons, it’d again be the space issue. But that really doesn’t have much to do with sharing or sharing specifically with Dave, it just has to do with the fact we live in New York and everything is expensive. If anything, right now the one con is that we’re not there a ton together, so I wish we’d get to hang more and work on things simultaneously. I’m sure this will happen more in the future; we haven’t had the studio for too long, so we’re still getting settled.
David: Actually, not really. I am someone who is very very influenced by everything around me so I like sharing it with Grant. The other thing is, I work there during the day, but Grant works a job Monday-Friday so he only comes to the studio at night. We are hardly ever there together, but I love seeing the stuff he leaves behind. That is definitely a pro. A con I see happening in the distant future is us making too much work and running out of space. But then we can have our first annual Willing-Geeting yard sale.

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?
Grant:

David:

for more of David and Grant’s work, please visit www.davidbrandongeeting.com and www.grantwilling.com

A studio visit with Ed Panar

photographs by Nathan Ward

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
My studio is in the attic of a little row house where I live in the Lawrenceville neighborhood of Pittsburgh. I have been working here since April 2011.

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
Pros: It’s the first time I’ve had a dedicated work space (ie, not in my living room or bedroom) so it feels like a lot of space to me, and a luxury to have a separate room to work in after years of cramped one bedroom and ‘studio’ apartments. The only other time I had a dedicated studio space was in graduate school. I also really like the view through the seasons.
Cons are that it’s on the 3rd floor, and the only bathroom is in the basement. It’s a long walk in the middle of the night down some pretty steep and narrow steps in the dark. I have to be careful. Another occasional con is the fact that it is still in my house, so sometimes I wonder what it would be like to have to go somewhere else to work. I work strange and erratic hours though so I really like being able to wake up and go to work straight away and working at odd hours.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
Too many to count. When I am awake in my home I’m in my studio at least 80% of the time.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For example, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
For better or worse, I don’t have much of a routine. Besides working on personal projects I’m also doing other freelance work here so the routine of the day normally depends on the projects that are happening at the moment. I try to work on things in order of importance, but sometimes I have the urge to work on something completely unrelated, and time permitting I try to be open to those kinds of detours as they often lead to new ideas and insights. I work very erratic hours as well, some days starting at 5am and other days wrapping up at 5am.

Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Unfortunately, no. There are very few rules and sometimes I’m amazed that I get anything done. I have an aversion to rules though, so I don’t think I would be very good at following them anyways.

Do you sometimes wish you shared your studio with one or a few other artists?
While I have my own space, it is still in the house I share with Melissa Catanese and our cat Mo  - so it’s sort of the best of both worlds. Her studio is on the second floor and when one of us needs a hand with something or an extra set of eyes it’s easy enough to help out. Mo helps out too on occasion.

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?
It’s really tough to pick just one, but a typical playlist on shuffle might come up some of these:

for more of Ed’s work, please visit www.edpanar.com

From an upcoming series I’m hoping will be finished soon, White Sands 2013.

From an upcoming series I’m hoping will be finished soon, White Sands 2013.

I answered a few questions about the studio visits features and my own practice on Matt Martin’s B-Rad Magazine. Read it here, thanks Matt!

- above photos by Alexi Hobbs, Damien Maloney and Johannes Romppanen