This is what I sent to 11 contemporary photographers whose work I’ve particularly enjoyed recently. The answers I got back are over at the Wandering Bears' website, as part of their 500th post celebration.
Thank you Daniel Shea, Mark Borthwick, Ed Panar, Bryan Schutmaat, Peter Sutherland, Shane Lavalette, Mark Mahaney, Estelle Hanania, Osma Harvilahti, Christian Patterson, David Favrod and Rob Hornstra.
Enjoy!

This is what I sent to 11 contemporary photographers whose work I’ve particularly enjoyed recently. The answers I got back are over at the Wandering Bears' website, as part of their 500th post celebration.

Thank you Daniel Shea, Mark Borthwick, Ed Panar, Bryan Schutmaat, Peter Sutherland, Shane Lavalette, Mark Mahaney, Estelle Hanania, Osma Harvilahti, Christian Patterson, David Favrod and Rob Hornstra.

Enjoy!

A studio visit with Jody Rogac

photographs by Clément Pascal

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?

My studio is on the edge of Sunset Park and Gowanus in Brooklyn. I’ve have been working there for 1.5 years.

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
Pros: I am no longer working out of my apartment — I have a space where I can “go to work” and hunker down. There are also many other lovely artists on the floor, which makes for a nice creative community. Cons: hard to think of many, sometimes the woodshop can get a bit loud.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
If I’m not out taking pictures I’ll probably be at the studio. I’ll spend anywhere from 3 - 9 hours a day depending on what I’m up to.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For exemple, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
I live close by which is great, so I stop and pick up a coffee on my way. Usually turn on WNYC. Then yes — emails! And then I’ll carry on with whatever projects I have on the go.

Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Nope, not a thing.

Do you sometimes wish you had your own studio? What are the pros and cons of sharing your workspace with someone else?
I don’t mind sharing my studio space as long as it’s with the right people. It’s nice to surround yourself with other creatives and have each other to bounce ideas off of.

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?

for more of Jody’s work, please visit www.jodyrogac.com

bryanschutmaat:

Texas in the 1970s. Photos by Marc St. Gil and Danny Lyon, found on The Atlantic

Reblogged from bryanschutmaat with 1,071 notes

A studio visit with Jason Lazarus

photographs by Parker Bright

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
I work at home in the Ukranian village neighborhood of Chicago, where I share a two bedroom apartment with a roommate, so truly it’s my bedroom and living room. I’ve been here for 9 years, and in that time many projects have created and nurtured, some making their way abroad with me in tow. Everything is about the computer, the phone, notebooks, and a few walls where things live to be mused upon. Smoking happens while on the phone, it is my major vice. Collaborators come over, I make them espressos, jokes are a must, music is a must, working hardest is a must.

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
I nap all the time. If I had my choice, I’d nap three times a day, waking early and working into the night. I don’t know why, but this is how it is. So at a home-studio I will lay down on a whim but a lot gets done, so I try to respect this rhythm and roll with it. At the end of the summer I will have a proper external studio for the first time, about 600 sq feet in a warehouse with windows facing two directions. The main concern is to get a lot of great plants, which have nothing to do with my artwork, and everything about feeling best in the world. The best thing about working from home is everything is at an arm’s length: negatives, books, the computer, cheese, or the bathtub even. I’m trying to keep social media tabs closed on my computer and really focus while working. This is a sort of virtual conundrum, which follows the computer wherever it may go. I also consider the studio a part of the brain that never shuts down, a kind of generative filter that things become stuck to while time passes. It’s important to be a dreamer… One’s interior life is a studio.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
Every day for me.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For exemple, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
Coffee/reading/writing/emailing/scheduling/meetings/photoshop/nap/repeat.

Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Nothing is forbidden.

Do you sometimes wish you shared your studio with one or a few other artists?
I am always working on the ability to work alone, because I feel pretty good about working with others.

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?

for more of Jason’s work, please visit www.jasonlazarus.com

A studio visit with Geordie Wood

photographs by Olivia Locher

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
My studio is on the banks of the majestic Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn where I do laps every morning. It also happens to be my apartment, I’ve lived here for about four years.

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
The obvious pro and con is that I live in my studio, which keeps work close in times of need but also too close to escape. That said I’m lucky to have a backyard and garden which provides reprieve from the computer at a moments notice.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
I stay on the move a decent amount but I am at my desk at least 30 hours a week. Though I find my work quickly seeps into all facets of life which is something I’m actively trying to avoid.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For example, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
My day starts with NPR and a cup or three of coffee. I respond to emails then dive into the lists and post-it notes which hold my brain together. The one constant in my routine is music. Whether it’s Atlanta rap or Bill Evans in the late 60’s I have the music at maximum volume all day.

Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Not necessarily, but I will say I’m easily distracted and my most productive hours are spent by myself.

Do you sometimes wish you shared your studio with one or a few other artists?
Though I work best on my own it’s nice to have people around at times, I enjoy an ongoing dialogue (at least digitally) with some close friends who work in photography. That said, I love the input of folks in other mediums as well, I’m a bit adverse to staying in the photo ghetto at all times.

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?

for more of Geordie’s work, please visit www.geordiewood.com

People!
As part of my Studio Visit series, I am currently looking for photographers living in (or willing to travelling to):
- Rochester, NY
- Athens, GA
- Katonah, NY
- Pittsburgh, PA
Anyone interested can contact me by email: paulinemagnenat@gmail.com
Thank you!
(image from Mike Sinclair, Popular Attractions)

People!

As part of my Studio Visit series, I am currently looking for photographers living in (or willing to travelling to):

- Rochester, NY

- Athens, GA

- Katonah, NY

- Pittsburgh, PA

Anyone interested can contact me by email: paulinemagnenat@gmail.com

Thank you!

(image from Mike Sinclair, Popular Attractions)

A studio visit with Jake Stangel

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photographs by Damien Maloney

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
My studio is in San Francisco, in an industrial area called The Dogpatch, on the east side of the city bordering the East Bay. Super nice, very mellow, sunniest part of town, with lots of creative folks here. Photographers, writers, designers, architects. It’s becoming more and more popular, and we have wine stores now. And a juice bar. That’s when you know, when the juice bar come in. Organic Juice till 2. It’s like Williamsburg circa 2006, +/- 5 years.  I moved to SF about 1.5 years ago, and was working in a windowless space for a while, which was great for scanning but sucked for life, so I got outta there and moved to my current space a year ago. Way more light, a rad studio mate, lots of space, 25 foot ceilings, and all the C-stands I could ever dream of.

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What are the pros and cons of your studio?
Pros are infinite. Bright breezy airy light white spacey. Lots of room to play around. The building is made of cement, so I doubt all my negs will be burned in a fire. Hopefully I didn’t just jinx that. Dogpatch is ideal, I have a really sick ice cream hookup nextdoor,cause my dude there rides bikes alot. I can get a big scoop of ice cream for the kid’s size price. Ice cream on a hot summer’s day, before diving back in front of a cool computer. Nice.
My studio is also like 15 blocks from my house, in Potrero Hill. I live at the top of the hill, so it’s about 5 minutes to get here in the morning and about 8 to get back up. I ride home for many lunches to spin my legs a bit, eat a big ass kale salad, read a New Yorker article in my backyard, then bomb the hill back down to the studio. Ice cream usually happens about 3 o’clock. We also got the largest bouldering gym (for rock climbing) about half a block away, so I try to go there to rip my arms off my body about three times a week.
No cons, at all.

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How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
I travel a lot for “work” and 99% of what I do is on location, but if I were to spend an entire week at home, not shooting, I’d say 50 hours total. There have been gnarly weeks where I’m here from 8:30-11pm with a break or two, but I really try to not let that happen anymore and get some hired help in to dedust and help me have a life. I used to work at a bike shop and the manager was of the mentality that there’s always something we could be doing to improve the business, from cleaning the place to organizing our shit in a better fashion, so I bring that over to my little homespun, mom-n-pop business.
That said, if I feel like I’m being unproductive or listless or unmotivated, I definitely don’t linger or dick around online. I’ve got a to-do list every morning, and usually I leave with 1-2 things left on it, but if I finish everything, I’ll get the hell out. The studio is awesome, but I try to keep it super productive, get things done, so I can go out and ride bikes, climb, surf, etc. I’ve realized in the last year or so that life is meant to be lived, not spend in front of a computer, so I’m always trying to lap up the myriad bounties of this amazing city and surrounding countryside.

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Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For exemple, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
Definitely start up spotify, definitely go through email. I’ve started a folder called “emails to respond to, later”, so I put a lot of less pressing stuff there. My inbox is kind of like a to-do list, so I try to keep it clear. Right now I have 5 in there, and it’s 5 things I need to do today. So, if you’ve written me, and I haven’t written you back, your email’s in that folder. I definitely post alot to tumblr throughout the day, as I post tracks I love, or work I’m really digging. Whenever I have a lull, I’ll write back to those less pressing emails.
I’ll do lunch around 1-3pm, and try to ride somewhere close and eat it outside. I think I’ve eaten in studio twice in a year. I go to a place called the ferry building alot to meet my friend Julia; we eat sandwiches on the water with a view of bridges and boats, get some sun, chill with the hungry pigeons that try to grab our sandwich crumbs. It’s all about getting outside, riding bikes, seeing folks at some point in the day, then coming back and being productive again.

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Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Facebook is the worst, I stay off of it unless I’m posting something, otherwise it takes out 30 minutes of my day before I even know it. Why am I looking at some gizmodo article? I dunno. I don’t want to do that any more. I set my emails to come in on the hour, not immediately. I have a weird OCD thing where that little red Mac Mail dot can’t be there. I’ve been alot more attentive to the feeling of getting listless, so when that happens, I refer back to the to-do list and keep going. I guess I’m productive so that I can get out ASAP and go somewhere near the ocean. To shoot a sunset. On Instagram.

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Do you sometimes wish you shared your studio with one or a few other artists? What are the pros and cons of sharing your workspace with someone else?
I already feel unsocial working for my self by myself, so I couldn’t imagine working in my own space, solo all day. Nice to have other folks around, even just as a presence. It’s also nice to share grip equipment and have someone in-studio if a file needs to get send out and I’m thousands of miles away. I guess the only con is that I can’t work naked playing Bonnie Raitt all day.

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What is your favorite track to edit photos to?

for more of Jake’s work, please visit www.jakestangel.com

Nice feature on (some of) my work over at the great Wandering Bears.

Nice feature on (some of) my work over at the great Wandering Bears.

A studio visit with Emiliano Granado

photographs by Cait Oppermann

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
My studio is in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn. Right across the street from the Marcy Houses. “Bed-Stuy, Do-or-Die!!!”

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
I get amazing light in my studio. Like, I have 30 feet of windows on one side, and about 15 feet of windows on another wall. I only recently moved in, and the last studio was basically a basement. Compared to that, this is like working in photographic heaven. I don’t have any real complaints. For the first month or two, the guys across the hall were smoking cigarettes. That kinda sucked. But they stopped. And there are cell towers on the roof that might give us some diseases some day. I try not to think about them.

How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
If I’m not traveling, I’m at the studio. So anywhere from 30-60.

Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For exemple, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
No routine at all. Everyday is different. That’s the whole point of this career, isn’t it?


Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Nope. I continue to tell myself that I gotta be more productive and focus more, but it’s the brain wanderings that lead you to creative ideas sometimes. Even “wasting time” on the internet leads to interesting things. 


Do you sometimes wish you shared your studio with one or a few other artists?
Hell no. I’m king of the castle!

What is your favorite track to edit photos to?
This song is for when I’m feeling romatically involved with my images:

This gets me hyped for the clone tool:

Late night vibez:

When it gets weird:

for more of Emiliano’s work, please visit www.emilianogranado.com

A studio visit with Jessica Eaton

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photographs by Alexi Hobbs

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
My studio is in Montréal, in the old town. This is a new studio for me, and one that I applied for. I moved in November 2012. It is in an old foundry building that was reclaimed to now be The Darling Foundry (Fonderie Darling). It began as an initiative between Usines Ephémères in France, and the Fondation pour le développement des artistes de la relève in Québec. They have a number of live work spaces for international artist and curatorial residencies, 2 gallery spaces, an attached restaurant, as well as 8 work only studio spaces for local artists that are awarded on three year terms and subsidized in the rent. I was very lucky to have been awarded one of the local spaces for the 2013-2016 term.

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What are the pros and cons of your studio?
Those are long lists. Pro: I have a lot of space for very little money, for three years. If I can stop agreeing to too many unnecessary deadlines that means I can take great risks. There are resources involved with the space, wood and metal shops with techs to go with, other artists around to take a beer break with and talk about art, lots of studio visits. Cons: there is no such thing as a free lunch so to speak, with any opportunity like this comes the bureaucracy involved.

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How many hours do you usually spend there per week?
It varies wildly as I have been travelling a lot. The weeks out of town obviously 0. When I am in Montréal anywhere between 30 and 100 actually in studio. In studio I have an almost useful couch turns into an almost useful bed made by Ikea. I’ll often just crash in the studio a few nights a week. I work many 14 hour days in studio but the work continues even when at home or on a so called “day off” in terms of emails and things like that. In my head the work is 24/7. Lots of teeth grinding in sleep.

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Do you have your own daily routine within the studio? For example, do you usually start by answering your emails then get to work etc?
You just named a problem I have been trying to solve. I was always starting with emails. At home, then continued into the studio. I’d have planned a bunch of studio work and come 7 or 9 or 11 pm still on emails. Or email interviews. Or press requests. Or other administrative work. I can more than full time job all of this and it would end I guess when I run out of art because for months no new art would be made. That is what is happening. It is a problem.

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Are there things you deliberately forbid yourself to do/have within the studio in order to be more productive?
Starting next week I will no longer read my email. I hired a part time studio manager. I guess I’ll read some of them but she will filter. Back to the art making.

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Do you sometimes wish you shared your studio with one or a few other artists?
Never. I would rather be punched in the face or hung naked from a flagpole than share a studio. I love studio visits and I love to throw little cinq à sept (often sept turn 4 am) small parties in the studio. I love the community of artist friends I have built up over the years. But for making work, I don’t want anyone around unless they are helping. I need a lot of space. Physically and mentally. I need to leave “live sets” up for days or weeks and if someone bumped a light in passing it would ruin everything. I need to cry or dance or spread a million things all over the floor in the middle of my space and not have to consider what anyone else thinks or needs.

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What is your favorite track to edit photos to?
This one. Not a track exactly. I would have responded differently if you asked what music I like to work to in the studio. “Edit photos” to me speaks of the computer work. Because I am not shooting piles of digital images, my editing consists of long waits for hi res scans of large format film and then hours of meticulous dusting. For that I like to watch (more like listen/glance at) TV on a second monitor. Law and Order (and Law and Order SVU) is perfect because 1. awesome! 2. there are hundreds and hundreds of episodes…. and most importantly 3. the shows are largely dialogue driven. You don’t necessarily need to be looking at their pictures to get the story.